Buzzard; Buteo buteo; Ormvråk

An Indian summer

John Bradbury described an Indian Summer well when he wrote,

The air is perfectly quiescent and all is stillness, as if
Nature, after her exertions during the Summer, were now at rest.

 


Buzzard; Buteo buteo; OrmvråkThis passage written back in 1817 is as relevant today as it was way back then. The term "Indian Summer" dates over two hundred years and often when we get these still calm days at this time of year people mention an ‘Indian Summer’ and OK it may technically may still be a little early for that as meteorologically it should be defined as: any spell of warm, quiet, hazy weather that may occur in October or even early November.

What ever it’s called the decent spell of pleasantly warm weather is continuing here at Alledal, The nights may be getting chilly but the balmy and hazy days are giving a feel of early June not late September. We’ve been making the most of it and extracted the last of the honey for 2009. The bees will now be fed with sugar syrup and treated for the varroa mite and left to their own devices for the winter months. We’ve managed over 50lb of honey this time and already we have the orders coming in. It seems there are a lot of people who appreciate pure unblended honey straight from the hive.

Technically autumn begins this week with Tuesday’s autumnal equinox. I love the autumn. I think it is my favorite season of the year, but I probably say that about every season as I anticipate its arrival. Where I live in southern Sweden, the trees put on a spectacular foliage display. The days are clear, crisp and cool. I take long walks with Troy and breathe deeply.

Another great thing about this time of year are the big bright full moons that grace the skies. The Harvest moon – next week is the first full moon after the autumnal equinox. This bright moon's late evening light after sundown helps farmers work late to bring in the crops. The next special moon is the Hunter’s Moon. Traditionally this is the first full moon after the Harvest Moon. The Hunter’s moon rises soon after sunset and provides hunters which extra light to track prey.

Out in the barn on e of the Muscovies far from preparing for winter, has been sat on a clutch of four eggs. I didn’t expect much from them at this time of year but as she wasn’t easily dissuaded I left her to it. Sure enough last week I walked into the barn to hear a characteristic pipping that can only come from baby ducks.  SO it looks like we may be plus two muscovies, all I can say for now is – mother and babies doing well.

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